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history is and how important it is to know. [applause] >> next from the georgetown university law center in washington, d.c., a discussion on the supreme court. it's about one hour and ten minutes. >> hello, everyone. i want to welcome you to today's program, which features an all-star lineup of authors who will be discussing their most recent books on the supreme court. i am a professor here at georgetown and executive director of the supreme court institute. it's a real privilege for the supreme court institute to host this event and i would like to thank our deputy director for putting it all together. before i turn the program over to our moderator i would like to remind everyone that after the program we have a reception following in which he will get a chance to have all of your newly purchased books signed by the authors and have a word or two with the authors hopefully coming in as you can see, we have food and beverage, so please stick around after the program. with that, i would like to introduce our moderator for today's program. tony really needs no introduction at all sali w
protestant churches. this reinforced a second exceptional pillar, common law, which posits that god-given, or the laws given from god to the people and it bubbles up word to the rumors. it gives us the government of the people, by the people and for the people that lincoln referred to. common-law stand in stark opposition to almost every other nation on earth that has developed some form of civil law come in which law trickles down from the top. both germany and england had common-law for a while, but by the 20th century both have more or less abandoned it. germany more so than england. therefore, by the end of world war ii, when you have unloaded however unwillingly its colonies, those colonies were themselves designed on principles of civil law. us, the first two pillars taken together mean that a christian, protestant religion influenced and shaped everything about american foundation of laws and defined its system of personnel rights. it wasn't just that the united states was a democratic republic, but that the very premises of what a democratic republic meant were likely to be
or may not know because of the long history of copyright law in the library of congress this jefferson building is quite literally the house that copyright bills. let me start by introducing briefly the distinguished . let me start by introducing briefly the distinguished panel that we have. to my left is tom allen, former congressman from maine and chief executive officer of the association of american publishers. to his left his james shapiro, who is a professor of english and a shakespearean scholar and an author and vice president of the author's built, a professor at columbia university. thank you for coming down from new york. did you also come down from new york? from washington. you are everywhere. then we have peter jaszi, professor of copyright law at the washington college of law, american university, also an author. i will say also peter would not want me to, recently given the great honor by his colleagues at the washington college of law to have a lecture named after him. congratulations and thank you for joining us. [applause] so our topic is copyright and the book. very
history of copyright law and this jefferson building is literally the house that copyright built. with them let me start by introducing briefly for a distinguished panel that we have. their biography in depth is online and in your brochure and tom allen president and chief executive officer of american publishers and we have james shapiro a shakespearean scholar and in the professor and vice president of the authors guild and is from columbia university. and peter jaszi professor of copyright law from the washington end college of law and is also an author and although he would not want me to was recently given the great honor by his colleagues to have a lecture named after him. congratulations. [applause] our topic is "copyright and the book" a very small topic. i want to reflect on the title because "copyright and the book" at its core is about the public interest with authors and publishers as part of the public interest. i would underscore that because sometimes in political circles it is brought up were authors and publishers are empathetic call or in the competition with th
-selection nomination. and i'll get to that. he graduated from lawrence university and the school of law at stanford university. he has served with distinction throughout his career, earning accolades such as recognition as the washington, d.c., antitrust lawyer of the year by "best lawyers" and as well as one of the decade's most influential shall lawyers by the "national law journal." he's currently head of the antitrust practice group, a very distinguished proud firm based in washington, arnold & porter. and there he draws and his on his 35 years of experience in civil and criminal investigation to manage that work in the area of antitrust litigation, international cartel investigations, and merger and acquisition reviews. in an earlier chapter in his life, bill baer served over several periods at the f.t.c., rising from a trial attorney general during his first term there in 1975 to serve as assistant to the chairman, then assistant general counsel, and between 1995 and 1999 as director of the bureau of competition. but here's the point that i think really speaks to the fact that bill baer's nom
, it defies the laws of logic. i have been sitting there across the table from you forever. i have kept my eyes peeled, and there never has been a pin prick of any kind. once more, this wacky stuff, you crawl space and time has never existed either. nor will it ever exist. why is that? because nothing comes of nothing. zero upon zero equals zero. the idea that the basic facts could ever change is ridiculous. it defies the first law. the law of the conservation of energy. every respectable scientists will understand, why live, in exasperation and trying to get simple objects across to you, infinitely smaller than a pinprick infinitely shows its head. suddenly, a call of singularity. this just does not make sense. act as if nothing has happened. meanwhile, that pinprick blows up so fast that it makes me dizzy. and it has three properties that never existed before. three properties that are common sense prevailed should not exist. those properties are time, space, and speed. how in the nonexistent world to the nothingness pull this off? the pinprick keeps coming out. a space-time manifold occ
began to question whether or not the law that was passed by washington intawrk bun wig example where law were constitutional. it habit come up since the 1930s. >> the november 2012 elections. >> i don't want to talk about 2012. i'm tired of twelve. let's talk about the future. 2012 wasn't very good for us. we have to figure out a way to appeal to a bigger e lek trait. >> are you running for president? >> that's classified. yant -- your clearance is not high enough to hear that. >> i want to be part of the national debate but it's too early for that. >> "government bullies." >>> you're watching booktv, now william exams how bill and hiking's personal relationship has affected their political lives. he recounts the couple's often tun lent marriage and how each assisted in the other career's gains. it's about an hour. [applause] >> good even, everybody. thank you all for being here. i'm the director of the kansas city public library. it's a great pleasure to have you here and have william chafe here to talk about his excellent new book, the book that boston globe called a reflective, ranchy
. and a provision in the law which was added by senator schumer of new york years ago which helps working families to pay for college education, that too was included in this measure. so from a working family perspective, there are many good and important elements that were included in this measure. we also considered a lot of other tax measures, some of which i liked and some i didn't like. one of them in particular, the estate tax, is a tax that is widely misunderstood. this is a tax which applies to the very, very small fraction of a percentage of american families that when the breadwinner passes away have a valuable estate that can be subject to federal taxation. it is a very small percentage. some 3% might be affected by an estate tax and at the higher levels that we've discussed in our debate on this issue, less than 1% of estates end up paying any tax whatsoever into the federal government. the republicans insisted on a provision which senator kyl of arizona had been championing for years which would raise the exemption for states to over $5 million, which means a $5 million -- $5.1 millio
institution, where he chairs the hoover taskforce on national security and law and cochairs the hoover task force on the virtues of a free society. in the past he served as an associate professor at george mason university school of law and an assistant and associate professor at harvard university. he is the author of virtue and the making of modern liberalism and the ethics seven moralist. he holds that j.d. and a ph.d. in political science from this institution, a master's in philosophy from the hebrew university of jerusalem and a d.a. in english literature from swarthmore college. i feel sort of silly introducing these people because everyone knows who they are, but still, i have to. serve as the editor in chief of commentary magazine from 1960- 1995, and is their current editor at large. he was awarded the presidential medal of freedom by george w. bush. he served as a senior fellow at the hudson's -- hudson institute and was a senior fellow and is the author of many books and articles, including the bush doctrine, what the president said, and what it means, world war four, the long s
pollution laws delude cost factories money. this is in public school. if that isn't taxation without representation, i don't know what is. [applause] >> that's the left on unreasonable and inconsistent to ensure that no one will adopt them accidentally because of their utility. they are a perfect pledge of allegiance to the lack of reason ensures the must be continually repeated as such and that every possible instance or location would be introduced by a protestation of faith or enough of the oversight. should they admit to the obsessive incantations to be repressed which is doubt buy accidentally introduced to see also the marine recruit who is or was drilled to begin each sentence response if he was instructed deutsch would offer himself for sex. this was noted by the colleges in 1921 boesh year the division will overcome by authority shocked into the compulsive confession of his willingness to submit to read as with houseguests and strangers one of the communities taxed with establishing his bonafide unhappy family work and a fireman or religious organization in the community in
did what people in washington usually do he parlayed his fame into lucrative law practice. he parlayed his lucrative law practice into political connections and parlayed his political connections into a john. that was the culmination of francis scott key's political career in 184 when he was appointed to be the district attorney for the city of washington. what he did in that time, i wouldn't say it was as significant as writing "the star-spangled banner" which was obviously an enduring feat but it was very important. an unknown fact about francis scott key that his best friend and brother-in-law was a man named roger taney. roger town any was like key, politically ambitious and, with key's help ascended to jobs in the administration of the andrew jackson. first key helped taney become the u.s. attorney general and then the secretary of the treasury and then in 1836, the chief justice of the supreme court. roger tawney went on to right the dred scott digs in the 1857 which effectively legalized slavery and hastened the coming of the civil war. to key and tawnye were inseparable and inf
you in a bad position of the post office. but instead of saying get over it, many state laws about privacy. when supreme court dealt with the case about gps, the supreme court didn't say, hey, we have technology, get over privacy, they said -- and this is a supreme court that doesn't agree on anything, they said privacy is important. something even this minor is where you are to give away information about whether you know it or not abortion clinic, a competitor to your bosses, this information is being tracked on the web through smart phones actually have huge ramifications. it's what we do? in europe, they actually have protective laws. you can find out what data aggregators are talking about you, if you have wrong information, you can correct it. so i might be googling diabetes or a friend or a product, and not for, it doesn't mean that i'm unhealthy, but the federal trade commission is actually considering having a do not track regulation. sort of like the do not call list. i will end up with something that the trade commission that when we were on a panel together. the chairma
it or not. i was born in flint, michigan. i went to law school and became a lawyer and clerk for justice powell of the supreme court. was a lawyer and was planning to do that for my career in washington. was plucked to be general counsel of the parent company of abc back in 81. i did that for a few years. through a roundabout way i ended up becoming president of abc news. it's not something i ever saw to do. even when what to do it i did it because we need secession plant because we needed secession plan and his i thought i would do it for a couple of years. the biggest surprise was that came to absolutely love it. i've met some wonderful jobs. i've been very blessed, but been any news organization like abc news, much less running it is a rare privilege. that's part of the reason i wrote the book is, people have not had that experience, some sense what it is like. >> how do you get to go to the supreme court? what was that process? what did you learn at the supreme court that helped you run abc? >> as i said it went to michigan undergraduate, and sort of wandered into the law. i was fort
of the law about campaign finance were laws that had been passed in the progressive era and there wasn't a lot of attention paid to campaign finances. this kind of introduces the campaign finance question very quickly. i don't think there was anything illegal. i don't think it passes the smell test. people looked at it suspiciously. by the letter of the law, it wasn't illegal. and that was clear. and one of the parts of the story that gets messy is that adlai stevenson had a fun that was somewhat similar to knickson's fund and once that emerges, nixon is taking money from rich guys and that makes him exceptional, goes away. there's nothing illegal about it by the letter of the law. doesn't pass the smell test, and the question is, is nixon influenced by the money? there are ways to see connection between those who give him the money and the legislation he fought for as a senator up to that point and as a congress person. there's clearly some sense that you have kind of rowe real estate, antipublic housing policies that nixon was doing there were a lot of real estatemen giving him money
interaction with our country are to violate our laws or at best to completely ignore them. are we running the risk of inculcating a culture of lawlessness? i'd certainly like to have your thoughts on how we can avoid this problem and solve this issue by not only strengthening our country, but hopefully avoiding further demise. >> well, i think whatever way we define immigration has to include control of the border and has to include some kind of worker permit system which is actually rigorously enforced. that is i happen to think you're going to ultimately end up with some kind of system that has people who are resident but not citizen and who have a work permit but are not on a path to citizenship, because i think that's a matter of -- at some point, you've got to be practical about what is doable. but i think it's very important to insure as you build that that you're actually going to enforce the law. and i don't blame people who show up here. if we refuse to control the border and we refuse to identify who you are and we refuse to police ourselves and we refuse to do anything if we fi
father-in-law died inherited three slaves. the first lady's great great grandmother and she ended up in a rough rural community in georgia, the vast majority of people were not slave voters, white men worked the fields along the slaves they own if they owned annie and it was quite a different experience than the one we often think about. >> it was quite a different experience and i really enjoyed reading about the people of that day, how she worked the fields and the men who owned her worked the fields. i know that you were not able to determine the relationship between millvinia and the men who owned her. and i also know, code of silence. she never talked about it and her descendants never talked about it. i noticed the same thing in her own family and other families as well. it is about wilkerson who wrote about the great migration, the same code of silence in her family. what is up with that code of silence? >> this is a painful chapter of american history for many families. so i think at the time, people knew. it would have been very clear to people. the people i met and intervie
public law 106-392, and so forth, calendar number 269, s. 302, a bill to authorize the secretary of the interior to issue right-of-way permits for natural gas transmission pipeline, and so forth and for other purposes. mr. pryor: i ask unanimous consent the bills be read a third time and passed en bloc, the motion to reconsider be laid upon the table with no intervening action or debate, and any statements related to the bills be placed in the record at the appropriate place as if read. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. pryor: mr. president, i ask unanimous consent the senate proceed to the immediate consideration of s. res. 628 submitted earlier today by senators landrieu and blunt. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: senate resolution 628, expressing the deep disappointment of the senate in the enactment by the russian government of a law-ending -- law ending intracountry adoptions of russian children and so forth. the presiding officer: is there objection to proceeding to the measure? without objection, the senate will proceed. mr. pryor: i fur
required. i mean, some of my law school classmates, roommate, they say i was completely inept in making anything. ironic i wrote a book on manufacturing. i can write a brief, but i can't assemble a machine. it doesn't mean my skills is different or any better, its own market value, but somehow we frowned upon or don't appreciate the complexity of the skills required in the trade, and i think we need to both educate on technology and also have a real respect for how difficult the jobs are. >> you mentioned the importance of sustaining efforts to technology oriented education. which of our other current manufacturing facilitation initiatives do you think are really critical for us to sustain and what new initiatives would you suggest in order to stimulate our entrepreneurial success? >> great question. the partnership, a small program, but it's not well-known at the department of commerce, and what they do is they help companies figure out how to become more efficient. they figure out how to economize their production process or how to customize products, how they can find a path to profi
security, it's law enforcement. that's about a third of our budget. and it's not the part of the budget that's driving this -- it's not a part of the spending budget that's driving the deficit and debt much that's being driven by the growth in entitlements, which are becoming particularly for a good reason, which is that the american people are living longer, therefore taking much more money out of programs like medicare than they put in, and i suppose for reasons that are not so good, which is the cost of health care continues to go up. so we proved ourselves incapable of dealing with this crisis as part of the normal process of compromise, and so we created this cliff which was intentionally made so harmful that our assumption was that we would not allow ourselves to go over the cliff. because it would be so hurtful. and, again, that's why i say no deal, in this case, is not better than a bad deal. no deal is the worst deal because it means we go over the cliff. why isual thi is all this happe? for a lot of reasons. but one is that there are groups within both great political parties
at the hoover institution, where she shares the to hoover task force on a national-security and law and co-chairs the hoover task force on the virtue of a free society. in the past, he has served as an associate professor george mason university school small and an assistant and associate professor at harvard university. she is the author of "virtue and the making of modern and liberalism and the ethics of the moralist." he holds jd and ph.d. from science from this institution, and a and philosophy from the hebrew university in jerusalem and a b.a. in english literature from swarthmore college. norman podhoretz, who i feel silly introducing these people would still, have to. norman paul ha'aretz served as editor-in-chief from commentary magazine from 1960 to 1995, and as the current editor-at-large. he was awarded the presidential medal of freedom by george w. bush. he served as a senior fellow with hudson institute, and he was a senior fellow and is the author of many books and articles including the bush doctrine, with the president said, and what it means in world war iv, the longest st
in sit-in and that is what they find. most of the laws about campaign finance were laws that had been passed in the progressive era and you know there wasn't a lot of attention paid to campaign finance. this kind of introduces the campaign finance question very quickly. i don't think there was anything illegal. i don't think it past the smell test. i think people look at it suspiciously. by the letter cloth no he didn't do this and that was clear. one of the parts of the story that gets kind of messy, that adlai stevenson had a fund that was somewhat similar to nixon's fund and once that emerges, nixon taken money from rich guys and makes them exceptional kind of goes away. there was nothing illegal about it at the letter of the law. it doesn't pass the smell test by in most peoples's mind and the question is, is nixon influenced by the money? there are ways you can see connections between those who are giving him the money in the legislation that he had fought for as a senator up to that point in time and is a congressperson. there is clearly some sense that you have kind of pro-real
was educated at yale university and yale law school and immediately entered the navy where he received the purple heart for his service in the pacific theater. the awful immediacy of his war experiences made him a man who was dedicated to making every feasible effort to achieve peace. after he was discharged at the end of war, he worked as "newsweek" magazine, and in that job came into contact with joseph kennedy sr. who asked him to manage the merchandise mart in chicago. during those chicago years, he married the boss' daughter, eunice, in 1953 and chaired the chicago school board and the catholic interracial council as a supporter of desegregation of the city's schools. shriver's prominence in the commercial and social life of the state soon led to interest on the part of the political leaders to nominate him for governor of illinois. but by then his brother-in-law, john kennedy, was running for president. shriver served as kennedy's chair for illinois and also headed the campaign's civil rights division. in that capacity late in the campaign, he convinced kennedy to telephone coret
to washington without reading that book. [laughter] max boot, in the times when laws and rules and principles of strategy seem to be overwhelmed or out of date, he's become thee authoritative voice on military affairs always with amazing, consistent, unquestioned integrity, which is also kind of a rarity in the field which is marked often by to littization, and we are looking forward to more work. jay, who i just met a moment ago, i think we all here realize that serious thought an international affairs requires the widest range of reference that you can't just focus on one corner of the strategic realm, and you see his name, the authors line, you know you're about to get something with tremendous explanatory power, and with writings that go across the culture of the country and the arts. calling into account that annual fraud, the nobel peace prize -- [laughter] after they call it, nobody can ever say "nobel peace prize" again without saying so ironically. i'll turn it over to them, and i think we'll start with elliot, if that's okay. >> thank you, charlie. i -- we first met when i was a ver
that book. max boot, in the time when the laws of war and the strange symmetries of warfare, the principles of strategy seem to be overwhelmed or out of date, he has become the authoritative voice on military affairs, always with amazing consistent unquestioned integrity, which is also kind of a rarity in a field which is marred often by politicization and score settling, and has invisible armies looks like to being a major, major work. i haven't seen it yet but we are looking forward to that. jay nordlinger, who i just met a moment ago, i think we all here realize that serious thought on international affairs requires the widest range of reference that you can't just focus on one corner of the strategic realm. and he, you see his name in the office line, you know that you're about to get something with tremendous explanatory power, and whose rights go across into the culture of the country and the arts, beyond the usual washingtonian a country and -- washingtonian. and also a great phrase for finally calling into account that annual fraud, the nobel peace prize -- [laughter] -- after his b
regulation or too little. the results of that debate, i respectfully suggest, are thousands of pages of laws and regulations that are unlikely to forestall another financial crisis in the future. indeed, government rescues of large, insolvent firms couple with the the substantial compensation that ceos and senior managers of failed firms manage to keep for themselves mean that once the economy returns to a semblance of health, incentives to take uneconomic risks may be even greater than before. opening constructive dialogue on thesish b shoes will not -- these issues will not be easy given the current atmosphere in washington but would seem well worth the effort. thank you. >> thanks, tom. [applause] alex is going to offer a few comments. >> thanks very much to mark and cato for giving me the opportunity to comment on tom's very interesting and very useful book. i say that as having been a practicing banking executive. overbearing ceo, eh? i was a ceo for about 14 years. i wonder if i was overbearing? surely not. tom in his book cites frank knight's risk uncertainty and profit, a deservedly
% of the boat. the government agrees -- there's a lot, under greek law whatever party comes in first, take a step back, greece has proportional representation that deserves a word of comment. proportional representation is the peculiar idea that if you get a certain percentage of the vote in an election, you should have the same percentage of delegates in congress that right the laws. it you didn't do that you exclude the 18% that had a role to play in governing which you think is the idea. in european countries we have proportional representation. if you get more than usually a cut off of 5% to get whatever the percentage of your vote is that is how many seats you get. you all understand i assume we don't do that in united states. if you get 51% of the vote you get it all and 49% wage. we have had proportional representation in the united states in the past. when you read about primary, and they a gets 20 delegates for the convention and candidate b, that is proportional, they get an equal number of delegates, we actually recognized in the united states proportional representation, we jus
of law committee for the ocean. it is said that geography is one of the most important factors because it is the most permanent. we saw the arctic icecap drop and it appears to be opening more this session. what does this trend mean in a generation for russia and canada? >> i did go to zero chapters to it in the book. he is very provocative. in the middle of roberto they predicted china who was our ally would become our adversary geographically. also he said united europe could be a competitor for the united states. with the arctic icecap, if the arctic was open for shipping and a friend would sail the northwest passage up green land and across canada that shipping in the northern arctic that could provide alternative routes that is somewhat less of an emphasis of the indian ocean. to bring russia closer to america fundamentally. it would make canada significant you have shale guest, the tar sand and the hydropower resources with open arctic it would be that much more significant. >> i would like to offer a quick comment. to go through another level off from the decade. but with the ch
those nominees the kind of underpinnings where the laws allow capital to flow to the mortgage markets through various entities and numerous entities so the whole burden doesn't have to be borne by the insurance of f.h.a. and the united states government. so i rise with pleasure to say that i will vote in favor of carol galante for commissioner of f.h.a. and i yield back. a senator: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from tennessee. mr. corkerer: thank you, mr. president. i rise to speak behind the distinguished senator from georgia, who knows all things housing, has more experience in the housing market than any senator in the united states senate and always speaks with eloquence and balance. and i just want to second what he said. i've spent a lot of time with the nominee, carol galante. she is technically very proficient. mr. president, just over the last two weeks, she has put in place reforms that are very, very strong. they're just a start and i know that a lot more needs to happen at f.h.a. but she's put in place some very significant reforms. one of the things th
regulation, airline india they're accused of breaking in penalized for breaking a law in india. those are the stories we write about. >> how come we haven't heard about that before? >> some of them behind. when is the case of john and judy teller died selling in a little town in missouri. they were fined $90,000 for having the wrong permit. the government said you can pay on our website $90,000, but if you don't pay them 30 days canaille of us are that million dollars. this is the kind of stature government is doing to bully people and we frankly think it needs to stop. they do the same of confiscating peoples land were saying you can't build on it because it's a wetland come at another swatter on the land. >> as a senator, what can you do to change policy? >> we've looked at some of these things and constructive legislation to set them. salon the wetlands, we say the clean water act since we can't discharge pollutants into navigable waters. your backyard is not inapplicable water and dirt is not a pollutant. so we've redefined the clean water act to make sure they're not putting peop
," law represent pew boy examines haiti's history. david talbot presents a history of san francisco in the 1970s in "season of the witch: enchantment, terror and deliverance in the city of love." in "quiet: the power of introverts in a world that can't stop talking," author susan cain examines the benefits of an introverted personality. david drayly looks at 1862 and the actions of abraham lincoln in "rise to greatness: abraham lincoln's most perilous year." and in "full body burden: growing up in the nuclear shadow of rocky flats," kristin iverson investigates the nuclear weapons plant that was located near her childhood home. for an extended list of links to various publications' book selections, visit booktv's web site, booktv.org or facebook.com/booktv. >> and another update from capitol hill as reporters wait here for word from lawmakerrers in closed-door meetings on the fiscal cliff. an update via twitter from chad pilgrim of fox news, reid's remark that he had made a counteroffer was off-the-cuff response and that there was no counteroffer, and "the washington post" quoting s
]. after that period the rule of law was applied a little bit more broadly. not necessarily for any other reason, other than making sure that they would be no new entrants to this kind of special club. >> in the western press during this crisis or uprising in syria, it was always described as the commercial center of the country. tell us about that activity. >> for several hundred years, if not more, it was basically sort of the meeting point between europe and asia. and has always developed, was developed as a center of trade and commerce. that continued, of course throughout the centuries into the 20th century, and made it what it is in terms of its trade, in terms of its trade potential. now, it's also larger than the capital, damascus, not by much but it's a very large city. it's not just the second city. so has been a place where many traders and manufacturers as well preferred because it was historically quite a vibrant or because it was far away from the center where they might have a bit more freedom, even though that margin of freedom was not wide. >> where are you from originall
syracuse university and the john marshall law school and has won accuracy in media irvine award for excellence in journalism. join me in welcoming our panelists. [applause] [applause] >> lee, would you like to start? >> it is such a pleasure and honor to be here. once again i was flattered to be asked to participate in the first seminar last year i didn't do too badly. i see some good friends out here and also some people i admire including if senator jim buckley. he deserve a round of applause. let us begin with a paradox. whitaker chambers. whitaker chambers was a soviet spy who became in bill buckley's words, the most important american defector from communism. and its treasonous adherents, continued in august of 1948 when he identified alger hiss, a golden boy of the liberal establishment as a fellow member of his underground communist cell in the 1930s. this was a former assistant of the secretary of state and adviser to of franklin d. roosevelt, acting secretary-general of united nations' founding conference in san francisco and recently named president of the carnegie end
law at the schools and to take orders, who believe that [inaudible]. of the cleric in charge. the politics of nigeria became complicated, simply because of something the british did. they were not satisfied. there had to be dissension, division in the sense of the political power in the country. so when the british left, before the left they created -- [inaudible] and naturally they wanted closest to their viable or already practicing a kind of structure, which is close to what the british practice at the time until later in the year. and so they not only falsified the elections that followed, preceded independence. they falsified even consensus. now, if you check the annals of home office, so-called home office, which is where the colonies are ministered, look for the book of harold smith was one of the civil service in nigeria at the time. he was in the white house and he got into trouble because he not will -- he did not want to carry out those orders. but falsification of the first elections. .. which is staged -- that is southern southerners from the eastern part. throug
and states all across the country were beginning to institute censorship laws. and hollywood had brought in will rogers who had been in the harding cabinet and was, you know, mr. protestant. and kennedy now positioned himself as the heir protestant, the non-jew. and he made himself indispensable to the industry as such. and studio after studio hired him. at one point he ran four major studios. and at each of those he demanded to be paid in stock options. by the time he left hollywood after only a couple of years, he was a multimillionaire because he knew how to manipulate those stock options. he knew how to turn those pieces of paper into dollars, millions of dollars. and he did. at age 50 having learned how to make an advantage of a disadvantage, at age 50 he had those millions and millions and millions of dollars. and at age 50 he knew the way the stock market worked, the way stocks and bonds are traded, and he knew that a crash was coming, and he pulled out all his money so that when the crash did come, he was left with his millions. in a extraordinary position. and yet with that cras
opportunity for women received greater opposition than his programs on race. congress had passed a law forbidding women to serve on fighting ships or in fighting planes. so by law women did not serve on an equal basis with men. women were also not permitted to attend service academies. at this time it was legal only to assign women to hospital or transport ships. bud understood that the culture believed women should avoid aggressive activities, but once again he took another view, and here's his view. i want to quote it. i have no problem supporting women in combat for two reasons. one, i remember well my grandmother's stories about fighting off the indians along with her husband as they crossed the plains and, two, the most vicious and cunning enemy i ever had to fight was a viet cong woman. close the quote. so in 1971 bud formed one of these wave retention groups. retention groups were these groups that he created to study problems in the navy; race relations, women in the navy, etc. and these, this wave retention group revealed general dissatisfaction with the reality that women wer
marshall law school and accuracy in media award for excellence in journalism. please join me now in welcoming our panelists. [applause] >> would you like to start? >> such a pleasure and honor to be here once again. i was flattered to be asked to participate in the first seminar last year and i didn't do too badly because i am back today. and icy some good friends out here and also some people including senator jim buckley and he deserves a round of applause. [applause] >> let us begin with a paradox. whitaker chambers was a soviet spy who became in bill buckley's words the most important american defector from communism. chambers's public witness about the seductive attractions of communism and its treasonous adherents began in august of 1948 when he identified alger hiss, a bold employe of the liberal establishment as a fellow member of his underground communist cell in the 1930s. this was a former assistant to secretary of state and adviser to president franklin d. roosevelt, the acting secretary general of the united nations' founding conference in san francisco and recently
that defend the united states of america and i'm proud of them. they have things like our federal law enforcement. with our federal law enforcement, if, in fact, we go into this meat ax approach, over 7,500 positions -- because it will come out of personnel -- will be affected. this could affect as many as 3,000 federal agents. 3,000 federal agents of the f.b.i., d.e.a. and a.t.f. now, they might not be laid off but they're going to be furloughed. they're going to have short-term furloughs. this is going to have a direct impact on morale, a direct impact on mission and it will have a direct impact on protecting the american people whether it's from cyber threats, border control threats, all the things that they do. the federal bureau of investigations, the department of drug enforcement, these are absolutely important. then the other area is in homeland security. we could reduce the mission hours at the coast guard by as much as 50%. now, the coast guard is absolutely crucial related to drug addiction -- interdiction dicks, not addiction, drug interdiction, and also protecting our boa
point has the joint chiefs into his office and they basically tried to lay down the law and said mr. president, we don't like the way your prosecuting the war. he curses them out in the most vulgar terms, which i won't use because c-span will get mad, and the chiefs leave. casino says i've never been talk to like that in my life. well, at that point, you put your stars on the table and say, mr. president, you have clearly lost her confidence in me, i am out of here. that's what george bush would have said had fdr spoken like that to him. we know this because once when douglas macarthur told that with roosevelt, roosevelt said douglas, you must not talk to the president like that. so these guys had an understanding back then that we seem to have lost in our senior leaders later on that their job is to speak truth to power. even when it's uncomfortable, especially when it's uncomfortable. >> that's why want to come right back to the iraq war and the current iraq war, and ask you why you think it is, i think, to the extent that has been blamed come a portion, it has rested mostly with
to become its director. he began at oxford in the junior position in law and social science of what he wrote to the ranks about the institution to become a tech executive. the cultural nature of human development, the accidental gorilla, peggy pascoe's book on law and race in america. daniel walker and his history of america between 1815 and 1848. ladies and gentlemen, niko pfund. anna. >> thank you very much for coming here. for listening to us talk friday afternoon. i'm so that we chose to spend your afternoon with us. i have spent 10 years working for a library in and spent about half of that time physically working in a library. as a director of nyu press, i am thrilled to be here and to talk to you about publishing. i was asked to give you a quick overview of our philosophy. it sounds a little pretentious, but i would say that in terms of how i look at what we do, it is squarely driven by the message of oup. we often say that we don't exist to make money, but we do have to make money to do the things that we exist to do. it really doesn't want form all the work that we engage in. perso
was an integral part of the museum. he was the first commissioner of the fcc, in which he wrote so many tough laws about stock trading, that when he was finished, he had a stock trading stocks and took his money out and put it into real estate. the way he made money he had now outlawed. [laughter] he went on to be the first irish american ambassador to great britain, as i said before. the first and probably the worst ambassador this country have seen. he did everything he possibly could to appease hitler. even when neville chamberlain, the author of the munich agreement, said that you cannot make a deal with hitler. kennedy kept trying. he returned to this country in 1940 in disgrace because he had made it clear that no american dollar support the british because they were going to get defeated. the only way americans could survive, he thought, was to make a deal with the germans and italians and japanese. but he said war would destroy the country, the united states. we would go back into depression, capitalism would be threatened. democracy would also be threatened. he became a pariah and an outs
to the law and order. many were heated arguments almost a danger point. local author polly jacobson wrote of it. when i first started working in san francisco in february of 1850, sawyer continued, i wanted to be an engineer on a steamer. mark twain nodded in disapproval but got sidetracked in performing the honest business of fighting fire and training a gang of ragtag adolescent boys. the city needed volunteers and runners. sawyer's life saving acts of courage aboard a steamboat, which mark twain had a particular horror, awaken the journalist at night and set him shaking cloud of cigar smoke. for that reason he had sweat rolling down his brow. his story of fire and explosion on board the steamboat independence. in which hundreds died. the steamer was launched in new york city on christmas day of 1850. it did not reach sentences go for the first time until september 17, 1851. a white trail almost abandoned. between houses peer and clay street wharf. the exhaust steam escape into the air like a virginia city hot spring. i'm going to leave out the shipwreck, which is pretty horrible. tom s
him and the rest of us one step closer to the spirit manifest in the law of the universe. as for dr. franklin, that tolerance carries with him a larger thing, being part of something larger. during his lifetime he donated the building front of each and every church built in philadelphia. at one point they were building a new hall and it's still there and called the new hall left of independence hall and he wrote the fund-raising document that says even if the constantinople were to stand here to teach us islam and preach to us about mohammed we should offer a pulpit and listen for we might learn something. on his deathbed he is the largest contributor to the synagogue, the first synagogue built in philadelphia. so when he dies instead of his minister accompanying his casket all of the ministers, preachers and priests in philadelphia went on to the rabbi of the jews that is what they were fighting for back then when the country was founded and that's still a struggle that we are in this world today so i hope that you have enjoyed my dissolution of the three lessons of my great heroes
. this is a little bit more like final passage in that this is before something becomes law and goes to the president's desk. and here again, we see rarely used until the early 1970's and then explosion. and then not for deep personal principle but for paralysis. i have found it quite interesting to hear some of my colleagues say, this was the constitutional design, the senate be a supermajority chamber. that is beyond out of sync with american history or any -- any facts. and they say, well, isn't there a story about george washington talking with thomas jefferson and george washington says, "you know, the senate's meant to be the cooling saucer and, therefore, wasn't the senate always a supermajority body?" and the answer is, well, no. it wasn't a supermajority body. as i've demonstrated by these charts, it was very rare before 1970 to oppose a final majority vote. and when it was done, it was done for principle. and when it was done, people took this floor -- they didn't have to but they took this floor and they explained themselves to their colleagues and the american public. because the framers
wrote the law partner, quote, there's not an acre in 500 here that a man in illinois would pay taxes on, and the people of mexico were far worse, quote, i've never seen a drunken mexican, that's the only good thing i can say, a miserable race, a few intelligent men lording over the rest, three quarters are pee-ons, and many slaves of the south. treachery and stealing are their characteristics and would make a miserable addition to any population of the united states. to another friend, he wrote just a week later that the only difference between the peons of mexico an the slaves of the south is the color, and as for making these peons voters and citizens of the united states, it should not be thought of until we give all indians a vote. these are hardin's thoughts on what's happening in mexico. that transformation occurred after only three months in mexico, and he told a third friend, although i was for annexing all this part of mexico to the united states before i came here, yet i now doubt whether it's worth it. so much for mexico, the people are not better than the country." hardin's
to my father-in-law and he mentioned equipment he had as he went utah beach in that period of time and i tallied it up you need about $200 worth of equipment, your standard soldier leaves the base today is going to walk out with about $25,000 worth of equipment. technology is really something that strikes me perhaps a little bit, as this quiet pathos, long, where argument is general said to come less inspirational, less strategic thinking and so forth that the technology path to technology patents encoded in the opposite direction. a requirement they have to spend more and more time trying to understand the type knowledge sheet, what it is, how to use it and their focus may be as gone there. in some cases they've done well with it. as a battalion commander in deserts, had this box stuck in my vehicle, basically a tactical cell phone and i was horrified because that meant anybody up to norm schwarzkopf could have a number to call me and expected a lot of supervision. really didn't happen. but my sense is that it's slowly been happening in the age of e-mail. do you think the revolution has
of international refugee law and policy. soboleff yearned to rally members of the non-bolshevik russian diaspora and he wished russians to do something akin to lindens recent flight across the land but in a july, soboleff decided it was up to him to do a proudly pattered canadian equivalent to go around the world alone by bicycle. likely he didn't have to do that actually. he departed shanghai on a battered secondhand bicycle, but then upgraded to a new bicycle in bangkok, then to a battered secondhand motorcycle in singapore. a benefactor gave him a brand-new aerial motorcycle in karachi, guaranteed parts and systems from aerial offices around the world. soboleff and his publisher can also think the worldwide services of the ymca, shell oil and the firestone company, and he depend on global availability of gasoline, oil and food. the array of industrial goods services that were now spent almost everywhere in the world. like a certain cycle in a south asian diaspora, soboleff made his transit with the encouragement of many scattered white russians. above all, it was his passport for which he was
that has hurt the middle class and has moved money upheld against gravity, defining the laws of gravity up to the wealthy from the middle-class. so it's both political and economic. it's not just a guy sitting around in a room saying let's screw the middle-class. it happened historically but if you don't understand how what why we are not going to get to a good fix of our situation right now. >> was one example of how the middle-class has gotten her? >> take the 401(k) program. the 401(k) program came in place of lifetime pensions and shifted hundreds of billions of dollars from the accounting of corporations onto the shoulders of the middle-class. take the housing crisis. $6 trillion of accumulated wealth in the mortgages and equity in american homes was moved during the housing boom, not the bust, the boom, $6 trillion move from the last homeowners to wall street banks. those are too big and enormous changes in wealth that happened during this period now. >> when did you start forming the idea to write this book? her previous book was the power base, correct? >> to be perfectly honest i
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